We should all be eating less meat and better meat
Never eat anything bigger than your head
Cookery Quote
Whenever you see crossed chives you are in trouble

Taste

United Kitchen - doing good by eating well

There are many similarities between joining the army and working in a kitchen. In the days of Escoffier the kitchen “brigade” was just that and promotion followed a closely defined path; you worked your way up through the ranks from commis through chef de partie, and eventually from sous chef to head chef. Kitchens were also the home of obscure ritual, cruel jokes and camaraderie in the face of tyrannical head chefs.

Mendi - nothing beats home cooking

Part of the onerous burden that must be carried by every food writer is to have people come up at parties, or in the pub, or at the rugby and ask where they should go and eat. The temptation (at least for food writers in Worcestershire), is to reply “In London”, it is so much easier to establish a gastro-advice no-fly-zone in the immediate vicinity of home. For openers it can avoid a certain amount of the unnecessary bad feeling that comes from straight talking. Every rule must have its exception and for us the exception is Mendi.

Before judging pies you should sing to them…

An invite to judge at the British Pie Awards is something of a hot ticket. The range of different food and drink awards grows steadily and each year sees a few more invitations to judge thumping onto the doormat. There are two elements that make the Pie Awards so special, firstly everyone concerned is implausibly passionate about pies and then there is the venue - the judging is held in St Mary’s Church, Melton Mowbray a very beautiful setting with a soaring vaulted roof and rich stained glass windows.

Nostalgia is alive and well

Wind back for thirty years or so and Francophiles were already cursing the onward and unstoppable march of Macdonalds and their bright golden arches. Food lovers grizzled about the loss of the small, local French restaurant that offered a dish of the day and provided a good lunch for the hungry traveller. Suddenly such places offered le Pizza or le Burger and prices started to climb. It looked as if this would signal the end of idyllic rural France, and it certainly meant huge disappointment to many a middle class “Anglais”.

Pies, beer and chocolate – what’s not to like?

The cellars at the venerable Stafford Hotel in London’s Clubland (the hotel is now part of the Kempinski Group) are very deep and very solid. Today it’s a great place to hide out as there is no phone reception whatsoever, but during the Second World War it did sterling work as a bomb shelter. In honour of National pie week (yet another PR wheeze, what will they think of next?) Head Chef Brendan Fyldes launched a special pie menu at the Stafford’s Lyttelton Restaurant and our onerous task was to try both the pies and the beers that they had been matched with.

Sausage Rollery

So far this has been the decade of bar food – burgers may be peaking but there are still serried ranks of them; the Scotch egg elbowed its way into the spotlight and quickly became ubiquitous; then the foodie triumvirate of Matthew Fort, Tom Parker Bowles and Rupert Ponsonby booted the pork scratching upmarket. Earlier this week Claire Morgan and Angus Mckean, who run the Red Lion at Barnes, set about rehabilitating the sausage roll.

Pages

United Kitchen - doing good by eating well

There are many similarities between joining the army and working in a kitchen. In the days of Escoffier the kitchen “brigade” was just that and promotion followed a closely defined path; you worked your way up through the ranks from commis through chef de partie, and eventually from sous chef to head chef. Kitchens were also the home of obscure ritual, cruel jokes and camaraderie in the face of tyrannical head chefs.

Mendi - nothing beats home cooking

Part of the onerous burden that must be carried by every food writer is to have people come up at parties, or in the pub, or at the rugby and ask where they should go and eat. The temptation (at least for food writers in Worcestershire), is to reply “In London”, it is so much easier to establish a gastro-advice no-fly-zone in the immediate vicinity of home. For openers it can avoid a certain amount of the unnecessary bad feeling that comes from straight talking. Every rule must have its exception and for us the exception is Mendi.

Before judging pies you should sing to them…

An invite to judge at the British Pie Awards is something of a hot ticket. The range of different food and drink awards grows steadily and each year sees a few more invitations to judge thumping onto the doormat. There are two elements that make the Pie Awards so special, firstly everyone concerned is implausibly passionate about pies and then there is the venue - the judging is held in St Mary’s Church, Melton Mowbray a very beautiful setting with a soaring vaulted roof and rich stained glass windows.

Nostalgia is alive and well

Wind back for thirty years or so and Francophiles were already cursing the onward and unstoppable march of Macdonalds and their bright golden arches. Food lovers grizzled about the loss of the small, local French restaurant that offered a dish of the day and provided a good lunch for the hungry traveller. Suddenly such places offered le Pizza or le Burger and prices started to climb. It looked as if this would signal the end of idyllic rural France, and it certainly meant huge disappointment to many a middle class “Anglais”.

Pies, beer and chocolate – what’s not to like?

The cellars at the venerable Stafford Hotel in London’s Clubland (the hotel is now part of the Kempinski Group) are very deep and very solid. Today it’s a great place to hide out as there is no phone reception whatsoever, but during the Second World War it did sterling work as a bomb shelter. In honour of National pie week (yet another PR wheeze, what will they think of next?) Head Chef Brendan Fyldes launched a special pie menu at the Stafford’s Lyttelton Restaurant and our onerous task was to try both the pies and the beers that they had been matched with.

Sausage Rollery

So far this has been the decade of bar food – burgers may be peaking but there are still serried ranks of them; the Scotch egg elbowed its way into the spotlight and quickly became ubiquitous; then the foodie triumvirate of Matthew Fort, Tom Parker Bowles and Rupert Ponsonby booted the pork scratching upmarket. Earlier this week Claire Morgan and Angus Mckean, who run the Red Lion at Barnes, set about rehabilitating the sausage roll.

Pages

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