We should all be eating less meat and better meat
Cookery Quote
Never eat anything bigger than your head
Whenever you see crossed chives you are in trouble

Taste

Meeting up with the chillies they call "scuds"

Weighing in at 2.9 kilos, David Thompson's latest book "Thai Street Food" is large enough and beautiful enough to give any cook pause for thought. It's an epic tome, take the entry for Pandanus Layer Cake – the "preamble" and "method" for this cake runs to a tad over 700 words. As David says in the preamble "The Pandanus Layer Cake demands a level of commitment, not only is it an acquired taste, but it also takes some time to prepare". So there you have it, this is a difficult recipe and you may not like the cake you end up with!

Happy Birthday BCA!

it sounds implausible but the Bangladeshi Catering Association is celebrating its 50th Anniversary. On 10th October there was a fine dinner (catered by Madhu's of Southall), many speeches and a host of awards recognising the excellence of the 12,000 curry houses in Britain. Here is my contribution to the glossy Anniversary brochure......

Much depends on the sausage...

All that stuff about eating well in England by eating breakfast three times a day is wrapped around a kernel of truth. There is something joyfully self-indulgent about sitting down to a full English breakfast – and all too often the only time we allow ourselves this luxury is when we are staying in a hotel. Whoever may be paying, the prospect of not taking up the hotel on the breakfast part of the Bed and Breakfast contract seems wasteful.

Nose to tail satisfaction

It's getting on for sixteen years since Fergus Henderson and Trevor Gulliver took over a derelict smokehouse near Smithfield and changed it into a rather stark white-painted restaurant called St John. Then it was another fifteen years before the Michelin men noticed what an important restaurant it was and gave it a star. Few chefs have done so much for the reputation of British cooking as Fergus, he has the happy knack of making the traditional seem up-to-the-minute and a steely honesty about cooking and flavours.

Stuffing the cakehole

Even as I write, learned academics are doubtless putting the finishing touches to their theories about the nature of the credit-crunch crisis. The trouble is that when they refer to "double dip" they are not talking about an ice cream cone and two lots of sprinkles, but I dare say that someone out there is busily correlating our need to eat sugar with the adverse times. Chocolate may soothe on a personal level but in the "macro" arena nothing short of a return to home baking will do. Sod the overdraft, let us eat cake.

In praise of the Monkey House

For nearly twenty years I have been meaning to go to the Monkey House, a place spoken about in hushed tones by some of the most hardened topers I know. This hostelry's proper name is the Cider House at Woodmancote and it is a bit of living history. There is no bar (you drink in the garden in summer and under a bit of a lean-to in winter or when it rains) and there is cider for sale. That's it. You do get to choose between "dry" and "medium", but it is cider or nothing. This is how social drinking was done during the 19th Century.

Pages

Meeting up with the chillies they call "scuds"

Weighing in at 2.9 kilos, David Thompson's latest book "Thai Street Food" is large enough and beautiful enough to give any cook pause for thought. It's an epic tome, take the entry for Pandanus Layer Cake – the "preamble" and "method" for this cake runs to a tad over 700 words. As David says in the preamble "The Pandanus Layer Cake demands a level of commitment, not only is it an acquired taste, but it also takes some time to prepare". So there you have it, this is a difficult recipe and you may not like the cake you end up with!

Happy Birthday BCA!

it sounds implausible but the Bangladeshi Catering Association is celebrating its 50th Anniversary. On 10th October there was a fine dinner (catered by Madhu's of Southall), many speeches and a host of awards recognising the excellence of the 12,000 curry houses in Britain. Here is my contribution to the glossy Anniversary brochure......

Much depends on the sausage...

All that stuff about eating well in England by eating breakfast three times a day is wrapped around a kernel of truth. There is something joyfully self-indulgent about sitting down to a full English breakfast – and all too often the only time we allow ourselves this luxury is when we are staying in a hotel. Whoever may be paying, the prospect of not taking up the hotel on the breakfast part of the Bed and Breakfast contract seems wasteful.

Nose to tail satisfaction

It's getting on for sixteen years since Fergus Henderson and Trevor Gulliver took over a derelict smokehouse near Smithfield and changed it into a rather stark white-painted restaurant called St John. Then it was another fifteen years before the Michelin men noticed what an important restaurant it was and gave it a star. Few chefs have done so much for the reputation of British cooking as Fergus, he has the happy knack of making the traditional seem up-to-the-minute and a steely honesty about cooking and flavours.

Stuffing the cakehole

Even as I write, learned academics are doubtless putting the finishing touches to their theories about the nature of the credit-crunch crisis. The trouble is that when they refer to "double dip" they are not talking about an ice cream cone and two lots of sprinkles, but I dare say that someone out there is busily correlating our need to eat sugar with the adverse times. Chocolate may soothe on a personal level but in the "macro" arena nothing short of a return to home baking will do. Sod the overdraft, let us eat cake.

In praise of the Monkey House

For nearly twenty years I have been meaning to go to the Monkey House, a place spoken about in hushed tones by some of the most hardened topers I know. This hostelry's proper name is the Cider House at Woodmancote and it is a bit of living history. There is no bar (you drink in the garden in summer and under a bit of a lean-to in winter or when it rains) and there is cider for sale. That's it. You do get to choose between "dry" and "medium", but it is cider or nothing. This is how social drinking was done during the 19th Century.

Pages

  • The Diner - Double decker
  • Hard Rock Cafe - HRC burger
  • Arbutus - Squid and mackerel burger
  • Haché - Cheeseburger
  • Eagle Diner - Golden Hog (wild boar)
  • Gourmet Burger Kitchen - Buffalo burger