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In praise of affogato - Mele e Pere

We are creatures of habit, or to be more accurate creatures of fad and fancy. When you grapple with the menu it’s as if some higher power has decreed that this is the perfect time for a particular dish, and that ordering anything else will end in disappointment. The last restaurant to occupy this slot on the website was Briciole and if you call it up from the archive you will be able to read of the joys of affogato. Well, guess what, at Mele e Pere in Soho we’re back among small Italian dishes and once again seduced by the charms of affogato.

Street Food? I don’t think so...

As each new restaurant opens for business the hopes and fears of both the backers and proprietors are often revealed in the attendent forest of blurb. This verbiage is supposed to woo any wavering potential customers or reviewers. When launching Colony – “bar, grill, private dining” - the really smart move would have been to write the name of the executive chef ATUL KOCHAR rather large and leave it at that.

The rise and rise of small dishes – Briciole

There is no doubt that the small-dishes-low-entry-price-point strategy goes from strength to strength and the latest, (packed to the gunnels and bustlingly busy), exponent of the art is an Italian restaurant on Crawford Street called Briciole. As is the way when a new place gets a hatful of glowing reviews it is rammed, but for once the enthusiasm seems justified. Briciole is masterminded by Maurizio Morelli of Latium – a restaurant that opened in 2003 and specialises in dishes from Lazio.

The oldest new discovery there has ever been

I first sang the praises of Monty’s South Ealing Road in the early 1990’s, it was the perfect local curry house and despite a smattering of novel Nepalese dishes its great strengths were always: balanced and inspired spicing, huge portions and steady prices. In short it was the sort of place everyone would like to have at the bottom of their road. In the beginning there was the Ealing Tandoori then when it closed each of the kitchen brigade set up a series of new restaurants – they were all good and they were all called Monty’s.

Chuletón con hueso

In 2007, or thereabouts, Worcester R.F.C.’s under seventeen team were looking for a suitably exciting final tour for the boys and the daddies who had been together since the little darlings started their rugby careers at under eight. We ended up in Biarritz where it rained a lot; where the prices were astronomical (astonishingly costly beer); and surprisingly the teams we played were not very good. For one game, however, we slipped over the border into Spain for a fixture. The club we played was a small town affair and their players made up in bravery what they lacked in skill.

Opening the Tramshed

The Tramshed, Mark Hix’s largest and latest project, is open for business on Rivington Street in Shoreditch. First there was the Oyster and Chophouse, then the Oyster and Fish House in Lyme Regis; then Hix Soho; then Hix at Brown’s Hotel; then Hix at Selfridges; then Hix at the Belgravia Hotel; and finally, after a lengthy planning arm-wrestle, the 150 seater Tramshed has thrown open its doors. Hix doesn’t look like a restaurant tycoon, he is fond of rather obscure and tatty T shirts and always looks somewhat bemused.

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In praise of affogato - Mele e Pere

We are creatures of habit, or to be more accurate creatures of fad and fancy. When you grapple with the menu it’s as if some higher power has decreed that this is the perfect time for a particular dish, and that ordering anything else will end in disappointment. The last restaurant to occupy this slot on the website was Briciole and if you call it up from the archive you will be able to read of the joys of affogato. Well, guess what, at Mele e Pere in Soho we’re back among small Italian dishes and once again seduced by the charms of affogato.

Street Food? I don’t think so...

As each new restaurant opens for business the hopes and fears of both the backers and proprietors are often revealed in the attendent forest of blurb. This verbiage is supposed to woo any wavering potential customers or reviewers. When launching Colony – “bar, grill, private dining” - the really smart move would have been to write the name of the executive chef ATUL KOCHAR rather large and leave it at that.

The rise and rise of small dishes – Briciole

There is no doubt that the small-dishes-low-entry-price-point strategy goes from strength to strength and the latest, (packed to the gunnels and bustlingly busy), exponent of the art is an Italian restaurant on Crawford Street called Briciole. As is the way when a new place gets a hatful of glowing reviews it is rammed, but for once the enthusiasm seems justified. Briciole is masterminded by Maurizio Morelli of Latium – a restaurant that opened in 2003 and specialises in dishes from Lazio.

The oldest new discovery there has ever been

I first sang the praises of Monty’s South Ealing Road in the early 1990’s, it was the perfect local curry house and despite a smattering of novel Nepalese dishes its great strengths were always: balanced and inspired spicing, huge portions and steady prices. In short it was the sort of place everyone would like to have at the bottom of their road. In the beginning there was the Ealing Tandoori then when it closed each of the kitchen brigade set up a series of new restaurants – they were all good and they were all called Monty’s.

Chuletón con hueso

In 2007, or thereabouts, Worcester R.F.C.’s under seventeen team were looking for a suitably exciting final tour for the boys and the daddies who had been together since the little darlings started their rugby careers at under eight. We ended up in Biarritz where it rained a lot; where the prices were astronomical (astonishingly costly beer); and surprisingly the teams we played were not very good. For one game, however, we slipped over the border into Spain for a fixture. The club we played was a small town affair and their players made up in bravery what they lacked in skill.

Opening the Tramshed

The Tramshed, Mark Hix’s largest and latest project, is open for business on Rivington Street in Shoreditch. First there was the Oyster and Chophouse, then the Oyster and Fish House in Lyme Regis; then Hix Soho; then Hix at Brown’s Hotel; then Hix at Selfridges; then Hix at the Belgravia Hotel; and finally, after a lengthy planning arm-wrestle, the 150 seater Tramshed has thrown open its doors. Hix doesn’t look like a restaurant tycoon, he is fond of rather obscure and tatty T shirts and always looks somewhat bemused.

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