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10 Greek Street and the secret winelist

Some restaurants open quietly without the assistance of a frontal assault by the shock troops of restaurant PR. Every new opening generates an undercurrent of gossip (because that is the nature of gossip) but only rarely are the comments of reviewers and the Fooderati universally benign. 10 Greek Street has been open for several months now and continues to get a consistently good press. The only obvious niggle being grumbles about the “no booking” rule which applies in the evenings.

From the floor up - Chavot

Eric Chavot has a smile on his face. His new “Brasserie” is rammed and people standing at the bar must compete with the babble of contented dinners. This place looks very like a Parisian Brasserie of yesteryear and a key element to that look is the floor. A team of Italian craftsmen laid the mosaic floor and it manages to make this new venture look both old-established and comfortable at the same time. It’s not a new trick, (Les Deux Salons has a very nice mosaic floor), but a floor like this is a good investment and one that gives out all the right signals.

An angel falls to earth

Forty years ago the Angel Islington was just a crossroads. Upper Street came in from the East and St. John Street led off towards the Sadler’s Wells Theatre. Then came the redevelopment of the tube station. Somehow the little businesses hang on, the Angel Café still sells buns and coffee to school kids . The crimson neon sign at Red Lion – and theatre – still burns brightly.

Just William

In the beginning, William’s Kitchen in Nailsworth was an outdoor catering business accustomed to dishing up “Wedding Breakfasts” to large numbers of people in elaborate tents. The company first crossed the radar in the days when the British Cheese Awards held their celebration dinner in a big tent. In Stow on the Wold a couple of hundred people tucked into perfectly cooked lamb chops and crisp green beans and I remember thinking at the time it was an impressive bit of gastro- logistics.

Something of a pioneer – Dar’s Tandoor & Grill

To get my superficial generalisations in good and early… London is made up of a series of villages. Each has its own characteristics and each tends to be strong in a particular cuisine – so when looking for Polish restaurants try Ealing. For Sri Lankan food Tooting beckons. Which leads us to the question what’s special about South End Green, Hampstead? There is a smattering of neighbourhood stalwarts – pizza, chain restos, tapas, standard curry shops - but no great focus on any particular direction.

Danes raise the stakes - MASH

One of the side effects of the rise and rise of “Nordic” cuisine is that we are all ready to treat the culinary landscape of Scandinavia with a bit more respect. Only a little while ago suggesting that there was good food to be had in Denmark would provoke knowing sniggers and perhaps an off-colour joke about Danish bacon. But this autumn has seen the opening of an enormous and glamorous steak house deep in the bowels of the earth within the same building as Café Zedel.

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10 Greek Street and the secret winelist

Some restaurants open quietly without the assistance of a frontal assault by the shock troops of restaurant PR. Every new opening generates an undercurrent of gossip (because that is the nature of gossip) but only rarely are the comments of reviewers and the Fooderati universally benign. 10 Greek Street has been open for several months now and continues to get a consistently good press. The only obvious niggle being grumbles about the “no booking” rule which applies in the evenings.

From the floor up - Chavot

Eric Chavot has a smile on his face. His new “Brasserie” is rammed and people standing at the bar must compete with the babble of contented dinners. This place looks very like a Parisian Brasserie of yesteryear and a key element to that look is the floor. A team of Italian craftsmen laid the mosaic floor and it manages to make this new venture look both old-established and comfortable at the same time. It’s not a new trick, (Les Deux Salons has a very nice mosaic floor), but a floor like this is a good investment and one that gives out all the right signals.

An angel falls to earth

Forty years ago the Angel Islington was just a crossroads. Upper Street came in from the East and St. John Street led off towards the Sadler’s Wells Theatre. Then came the redevelopment of the tube station. Somehow the little businesses hang on, the Angel Café still sells buns and coffee to school kids . The crimson neon sign at Red Lion – and theatre – still burns brightly.

Just William

In the beginning, William’s Kitchen in Nailsworth was an outdoor catering business accustomed to dishing up “Wedding Breakfasts” to large numbers of people in elaborate tents. The company first crossed the radar in the days when the British Cheese Awards held their celebration dinner in a big tent. In Stow on the Wold a couple of hundred people tucked into perfectly cooked lamb chops and crisp green beans and I remember thinking at the time it was an impressive bit of gastro- logistics.

Something of a pioneer – Dar’s Tandoor & Grill

To get my superficial generalisations in good and early… London is made up of a series of villages. Each has its own characteristics and each tends to be strong in a particular cuisine – so when looking for Polish restaurants try Ealing. For Sri Lankan food Tooting beckons. Which leads us to the question what’s special about South End Green, Hampstead? There is a smattering of neighbourhood stalwarts – pizza, chain restos, tapas, standard curry shops - but no great focus on any particular direction.

Danes raise the stakes - MASH

One of the side effects of the rise and rise of “Nordic” cuisine is that we are all ready to treat the culinary landscape of Scandinavia with a bit more respect. Only a little while ago suggesting that there was good food to be had in Denmark would provoke knowing sniggers and perhaps an off-colour joke about Danish bacon. But this autumn has seen the opening of an enormous and glamorous steak house deep in the bowels of the earth within the same building as Café Zedel.

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